Taiwan

The Taiwan Central Weather Bureau has completed the establishment of the real-time seismic network in Taiwan in 1994. This network includes the observation stations distributed over Taiwan as well as in Kinmen, Penghu, Lanyu, and Pengjiayu. The instruments installed in each of the real-time monitoring stations contain a three-component (vertical, north-south, and east-west) short-period seismograph. The ground motion signals recorded at these stations are digitally transmitted to the Central Weather Bureau by leased line, and are stored for real-time processing, analyzing, and archiving.
There are three major seismic belts in Taiwan:
(1) The west seismic belt: It starts from the south of Taipei, passing Taichung, Chiayi to Tainan, with a width about 80 kilometers and parallel to the island axis. The frequency of earthquakes on this belt is low, but the aftershocks are more frequent with shorter duration. The scope is quite general and the disaster situation is severe. This is due to the fact that the hypocenter is shallower (approximately 10 kilometers) and the Earth’s crust changes dramatically.
(2) The east seismic belt: The northern end of this belt starts from the seabed off the northeast of Yilan. It extends south-southwestward, passing Hualien, Chenggong to Taitung, and down to Luzon Island. The northernmost part of this belt extending from Yilan, links with the circum-Pacific seismic zone to the western Pacific Ocean seabed; the southern tip of the belt is almost connected to the Philippine seismic belt. This belt faces the Pacific Ocean in an arc shape and also runs parallel to Taiwan, which extends 130 kilometers. This belt is characterized by frequent earthquake activities. Usually, the hypocenter is deeper than it’s counterpart in the western area.
(3) The northeast seismic belt: This belt extends from Ryukyu Islands to the southwest, passing Hualien and Yilan, and reaches near upstream of the Lanyang River. This belt belongs to a shallow focal seismic zone.

October 2013utc

summary

mag1= 0 , mag2= 1 , mag3= 43
mag4= 16 , mag5= 3 , mag6= 1 , total= 64
total energy released= 51,324.248 TTNT

September 2013utc

summary

mag1= 2 , mag2= 12 , mag3= 23
mag4= 12 , mag5= 1 , mag6= 1 , total= 51
total energy released= 240,938.585 TTNT

August 2013utc

summary

mag1= 0 , mag2= 8 , mag3= 28
mag4= 4 , mag5= 1 , mag6= 0 , total= 41
total energy released= 1,079.604 TTNT

July 2013utc

summary

mag1= 0 , mag2= 10 , mag3= 22
mag4= 6 , mag5= 3 , mag6= 0 , total= 41
total energy released= 9,056.970 TTNT

June 2013utc

summary

mag1= 0 , mag2= 11 , mag3= 34
mag4= 5 , mag5= 2 , mag6= 2 , total= 54
total energy released= 121,054.696 TTNT

May 2013utc

summary

mag1= 0 , mag2= 18 , mag3= 36
mag4= 9 , mag5= 0 , mag6= 1 , total= 64
total energy released= 22,483.656 TTNT

April 2013utc

summary

mag1= 0 , mag2= 9 , mag3= 20
mag4= 6 , mag5= 2 , mag6= 1 , total= 38
total energy released= 22,568.831 TTNT

March 2013utc

summary

mag1= 0 , mag2= 15 , mag3= 66
mag4= 14 , mag5= 3 , mag6= 1 , total= 99
total energy released= 45,010.048 TTNT

February 2013utc

summary

mag1= 0 , mag2= 8 , mag3= 27
mag4= 11 , mag5= 4 , mag6= 0, total= 50
total energy released= 11,549.230 TTNT

January 2013utc

summary

mag1= 0 , mag2= 7 , mag3= 37
mag4= 12 , mag5= 1 , mag6= 0, total= 57
total energy released= 5,007.085 TTNT

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